Anterior temporal lobectomy

Anterior temporal lobectomy is the removal of part of one of the brain's temporal lobes. It is the most common type of surgery for epilepsy.

Anterior temporal lobectomy is used to treat people with temporal lobe epilepsy, the most common type of epilepsy in adults, when antiepileptic medicines fail to control seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy usually causes complex partial seizures that begin in the temporal lobe.

For a person who has seizures that do not get better with antiepileptic medicines, anterior temporal lobectomy may be a good option. Having surgery may help control epilepsy better than if the person were to keep trying antiepileptic medicines.1

Citations

  1. Engel J Jr, et al. (2003, reaffirmed 2005). Practice parameter: Temporal lobe and localized neocortical resections for epilepsy. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology, in association with the American Epilepsy Society and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Neurology, 60(4): 538–547.

Last Updated: October 15, 2009

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