Diuretics for Ménière's disease

The cause of Ménière's disease is unknown, but it may be related to a fluid imbalance in the inner ear. This fluid (endolymph) is contained in a part of the inner ear called the endolymphatic sac.

Eliminating excess fluid in the body may help prevent the buildup of fluid in the inner ear and reduce the possibility of an attack of vertigo. This may be done by using medicines that cause the body to lose water (diuretics) and by eating a diet low in sodium (a component of salt). This treatment helps about three-fourths of people with Ménière's disease.

Commonly prescribed diuretics are furosemide (such as Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (such as Esidrix). Possible side effects of diuretics include weakness, cramps, nausea, or sensitivity to sunlight (especially for furosemide).

Last Updated: October 20, 2008

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