Endolymphatic sac decompression for Ménière's disease

The cause of Ménière's disease is unknown, but it may be related to a fluid imbalance in the inner ear. This fluid (endolymph) is contained in a part of the inner ear called the endolymphatic sac.

In endolymphatic sac decompression, a small amount of bone is removed from inside the ear. This provides more room for the endolymphatic sac when it swells with too much fluid. By providing more room for the sac to swell, pressure inside the inner ear is avoided and vertigo does not develop.

This is considered a relatively low-risk procedure. It usually does not cause hearing loss.

Last Updated: October 20, 2008

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