Riboflavin

Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a vitamin in the vitamin B complex. It is needed to help break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to be used by the body.

Common sources of riboflavin include:

  • Meats (especially liver and kidney) and fish.
  • Milk, cheese, and eggs.
  • Green leafy vegetables.
  • Whole grains and legumes.

The daily requirement for riboflavin is 1.7 mg for adult men and 1.3 mg for adult women. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding need more than this requirement.

Insufficient riboflavin in the diet (which is very uncommon) can lead to health problems, including skin and vaginal itching, trembling, sluggishness, dizziness, and clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract).

Last Updated: February 6, 2009

Author: Debby Golonka, MPH

Medical Review: Ruth Schneider, MPH, RD - Diet and Nutrition & Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Diabetes Educator

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